Promise the WolfPhoto by Earthfire Institute

For those of us who love wolves and know how critical they are to the health of many ecosystems, this year’s wave of government-sanctioned wolf hunts in states across the country has been nothing short of heartbreaking.

Given that reality, news from Wisconsin provides some welcome relief. A judge has issued at least a temporary stop to the wolf hunt in the state, which was set to begin in just a few short days.

The judge’s injunction came as a result of a lawsuit brought by wildlife advocacy groups. But what is behind those lawsuits? The collective work and passion of many people who simply couldn’t stand by—and instead, took action. Whether they made a donation to an environmental group, or called their legislators, or filed a brief, each contribution led to a critical change for wolves at risk of being needlessly slaughtered.

Notably, six Ojibwe tribes also filed a lawsuit to stop the wolf hunt. They cited it as a violation of their treaty rights, but their opposition to the hunt went deeper, to a place of longstanding cultural and spiritual belief. As the Red Cliff Tribe’s representative on the Voigt Intertribal Task Force, Marvin Defoe, said in a statement:

“The Ma’iingan (wolves) are our brothers. The legends and stories tell us as brothers we walk hand in hand together. What happens to the Ma’iingan happens to humanity.”

The belief that we are part of one larger community of species—from apex predators like wolves to the smallest living organisms—is at the heart of Reconnection Ecology. Once we recognize our interconnectedness with the natural world, we are motivated to take action on behalf of animals and ecosystems. And while our individual actions may not bring about the change we want to see, the power of our collective action is undeniable.

If you have taken action on behalf of the planet, reach out and share your story with us at wildlife@earthfireinstitute.org.

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