Three orphaned squirrel babies snuggle in a towel

Dear Squirrel Momma, We have your three babies and they are doing well. You took such good care of them---all three were sleek and well fed. Together, they must weigh more than you! How did you keep them all fed and cleaned so well? You had to feed yourself and make enough milk for them---and during the winter. What an amazing feat. The first couple of days were a difficult adjustment for all of us, as they didn’t like the rubber nipple and we couldn’t get them to defecate after the change in diet, but it looks like that challenge is over. The milk formula we give them is no substitute for yours, made by your very body and taken into theirs in an exquisite continuity of Squirrelness...

Seeds in various stages of germination

Seeds are tiny, magical packets of latent energy and potential, ready to burst forth when conditions are right. They contain the very essence of Life itself: ancient wisdoms and future hopes, exquisitely designed to adapt and evolve as needs arise. Part of Earthfire’s mission is to be a seed center. Here we gather selections of what we would like to see to germinate, take root, and unfurl into the light; stories that educate, inspire, inform and embrace hope and action. We invite you to partake, swap and share them. May they all bear fruit. A new study has determined that squirrels listen to songbirds to know when they're safe from predators. We know that "voting with our wallets"...

Squirrel eating nuts in a large hole in a tree

— by Dawn Harrison — One heartwarming part of wildlife rehabilitation is seeing the result of all the efforts put forth. For many released animals, the results are not easily tracked. Raccoons, for instance, don’t come by and say hi after being released and are more likely to show their appreciation by eating the supplemental food left for them and leaving little raccoon prints in the snow. But in the case of our most recent squirrel release, we are able to check in with the releaser and hear wonderful stories of how she is doing. The most recent update was to tell us that she had found a spot in a tree that suited her well and had not been back to the interim release habitat for...

Two orphaned and hairless baby squirrels

— by Susan Eirich, Ph.D. — Tiny arms intertwined with one another, the two orphaned baby squirrels lay sleeping. I gently disentangled the little girl for a feeding. So tiny they fit into one half of my hand, eyes tightly closed shut, delicate pink skin still unprotected by fur. The little boy stirred and started to protest, looking for his nest mate. They came from different mothers, different trees, in different neighborhoods, but probably blown out of their nests by the same ill wind that gusted fiercely a couple of weeks ago. Motherless, they found comfort in one another. When we got the little girl, she still had her umbilical cord attached. It was touch and go. At first she...

Mango

— by Susan Eirich, Ph.D. — A timid knock sounded on my hotel door the night before I was to return home from a family wedding. I opened it and there stood Cece, a sweet little eleven-year-old with both hands outstretched, holding a large mango. “Here,” she said shyly. “This is for Teton Totem.” It was a beautiful mango. A large, round, beautifully-shaped, unblemished mango, perfectly ripe. I had spoken to her earlier in the day about our animals---our bears in particular---and I said how Teton was a mango kind of bear. She was enchanted and asked a lot of questions. At lunch, there was an island in the center of the kitchen piled with fresh fruit. I watched, fascinated, as she...

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