Black Bear resting behind a large rock

— by Susan Eirich, Ph.D. — Huckleberry Bear Bear is quite elderly now, so foolishly, we trusted him. We wash the bear enclosures with a powerful hose, which is an object of great interest for the bears. (Ramble the grizzly snares one with some regularity and seems to find a thrill in the upset caused by the need to replace a severed and well-punctured hose at $60 and a 3-hour round trip drive.) But gentle black bear Huckleberry? Now that it is spring and the bears are awake, Huckleberry goes out into his Garden. There is a passageway from his enclosure to the Garden that passes quite close to the water spigot and its attached hose. Jean had moved the hose, he thought, out of...

A white wolf and a dark gray wolf howling together

— by Susan Eirich, Ph.D. — As I walk through the early morning cold, the wolves and coyotes begin their morning howl. I let the beauty of the sound vibrate through me, into me, into every cell of my body until the music of the howls and I become one. 30 March. The melting mounds of snow are forming great puddles on the land, puddles that are apparently irresistible to the multitudes of birds on the property. They are out there indulging wildly, ecstatically, fluttering and splashing and ducking and preening and ducking and splashing and fluttering for a very long time. The ice is gone! Freedom! Spring! The joy and excitement is contagious. Life is good. Hopefully our willow buds...

Grizzly bear in an enclosure

— by Susan Eirich, Ph.D. — It is late February. It is cold and blizzarding. Will someone please explain to me why Teton Totem decided to rouse himself now, of all times? I rush to the store to get dark lettuce for him. That is close to what they will eat in the wild to ease their stomach into the world of food again. He is interested. It is a bit of a break not to have to care for five bears for several months. But we do miss them. And on the very, very plus side... he survived the winter! It is a worry for me each year. I just can’t believe they can disappear like that (he went to bed in early November), not eat, not drink, and come out alive. It isn’t possible. But it...

Sparrow in hand

— by Susan Eirich, Ph.D. — It’s been snowing and snowing here---a welcome event as that is a normal winter for us. It is what life is adapted to here. Snow insulates the ground and the roots of the trees from the cold. The voles burrow along under the snow in long tunnels, feeding the magnificent great gray owls that come every winter. It gives us our water in the spring as it seeps into the aquifer below, nurturing plant life along the way. Sparrows in the trees | Earthfire However, for one unfortunate sparrow, plump and lazy from the easy pickings of stealing the chicken’s food, the snow was not a blessing. As the snow accumulates on the red metal roof above the horse,...

Earthfire Community

Earthfire Community

Donate to Earthfire

The Earthfire Council of All Beings

Conservation Conversations

Conservation Conversations

blog_retreat_img

Earthfire Retreats