Photo by: Nikola S

— by Susan Eirich, Ph.D. —

There appears to be a great, slow awakening among humanity.

There are two threads to this: one is our realizing how interconnected and related we are to all Life (carrots share 50% of our DNA); the other is how the impending climate crisis is forcing us to become more mindful of how we are living—and the consequences to all Life if we don’t. It is more useful to focus on this awakening rather than on dire predictions, as with hope and the development of a new story for us and the Earth, we will at least work towards something productive and positive—and who knows how effective that might be. It is worth a shot.

In any case, wherever I go to gatherings around the world, there are people doing their very best to change things. It is quite inspiring. It can vary from developing a deep understanding of our place in nature to how to deal with toxic sludge and restoring streams. But they are all doing what they can within their own talents and means.

In my last blog, I wrote about the Animal Energy World Conference. I also recently spoke at a passionate grassroots effort called the Global Earth Repair Conference, which brought together Earth repair practitioners, indigenous people, farmers, scientists, and non-profit organizers to outline what the world needs to do to restore the entire world biosphere, one piece at a time. The conference addressed both the technical and social aspects of planetary regeneration at local, regional, state, national and international levels, with the intent of drawing attention to the worldwide Earth repair movement.

It was attended by over 500 people representing perspectives from many parts of the world. There were over 200 sessions covering a wide array of topics and activities, including regenerative farming techniques, large-scale ecological restoration, dowsing, beavers, the need for systemic change, shifting human consciousness, reversing global warming, grief-work, soil ecology, global market capitalism, stream restoration, nature’s rights and toxic sludge. Cutting edge science, indigenous wisdom, and powerful personal stories were shared by visionaries, indigenous leaders, activists, teachers, artists, writers, and accomplished “Earth-repairers,” offering a heady combination of action and inspiration. There was a 24-Hour Global Check-in, which involved people from many different countries. Three webinars linked the conference to Earth repair leaders in several countries simultaneously. The massive amount of data from the conference is being turned into YouTube videos, podcasts and documentaries.

My talk stressed the need to save land for animals, and the paradigm shift in human values and perception of what is important, as the foundation for being able to save livable habitat for wildlife. There is also an interview, which can be viewed at earthfireinstitute.org/gercinterview.

There are Earth Repair Conferences in the works for South America in 2020, Africa in 2021, and India in 2022. Ideally, there will soon be hundreds of Earth repair conferences all around the planet. If you would you like to organize one in your neighborhood, town or region, contact earthrepair.friendsofthetrees.net. You can consider virtual conferences as well.

Dr. Susan Eirich is the Founder and Executive Director of Earthfire Institute Wildlife Sanctuary and Retreat Center. A licensed psychologist, biologist and educator, her goal is to widen the circle of conversation about conservation to include the voices of all living beings.

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