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— by Susan Eirich, Ph.D. — Who knew where writing about my love of slime molds and their intelligence would lead? I received a request from a woman named Liz Koch to do an interview for her website, and it was the slime mold article that made her call. One question I raise in the article is, how can a blob of cells without any nervous system outperform a computer in laying out the most efficient route to getting to food sources? How is that possible? Isn’t intelligence housed in the nervous system? What utterly fascinating questions this raises! Where might this lead in the ongoing detective story of who we are, our connections to other life, and the nature of life itself? In...

— by Susan Eirich, Ph.D. — The essence of Life is creative intelligence. Out of creativity comes resilience—the ability to envision and find a new path. Creative intelligence is a quality that physicists increasingly believe is inherent in the universe. Inherent in Life. And thus inherent in us.* This is what we need to solve today’s problems in a way that works for all Life. The question is, how do we tap into it? One of the ways we discussed this in the conversation is to unblock energy flow: flow within ourselves and on the planet; flow such as allowing free-flowing, undammed rivers; thinking in terms of ecological regions and watersheds instead of human-created political...

— by Susan Eirich, Ph.D. — Things used to be simple. There were two kingdoms, plant and animal, and one kind of real intelligence – human. Then we discovered that Life is creative and complex…Enter the brilliant slime mold. Every now and then a new scientific discovery is made that is so exciting, so paradigm-shifting, that we need to share it as widely as possible; to think about it; discuss it, absorb it into a new world view of the nature of Life. The good news--it is a worldview that, if we adopt it, will help with our environmental crises. It is so amazing it can’t help but foster respect and wonder for all life. As a little girl I was fascinated by slime molds....

— by Susan Eirich, PhD — When you look up into the sky and see ragged looking formations of geese (very ragged), you know it is late summer. The young ones are practicing for their long migration. In late summer, their haunting cries fill the air as they begin their sessions- a few geese here, a few there. I wonder how they find each other in the end, choosing companions for the long and dangerous flight. By now they have become more coordinated, individually and as a flock, and the flocks are larger, one goose after another taking turns at the helm. It is not an easy thing, making a perfect aerodynamic V formation. It takes work and leadership as well as instinct. I feel...

— by Susan Eirich, Ph.D. — There are places in Yellowstone National Park where alternating grizzly bear footsteps are worn deep into the earth, forming trails that lead to very specific sites at geothermal vents. These footsteps are almost sculpted into the ground as each bear places its foot precisely into the tracks of its predecessor, rubbing its feet sideways in each track. Arriving at the site the bears begin to eat the soil, high in potassium and sulphur. One theory is that the sulphur helps rejuvenate their digestive system after the long inactivity of hibernation, and they may be low in potassium after their winter’s fast. How do they know to go there? Does each bear...

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