Voluntary simplicity is a philosophy and a conscious choice to simplify our lives and consume less, for the sake of our planet and for the sake of our happiness. Where we discover that less, is more. — by Susan Eirich, Ph.D. — “…choose to live simply so that others may simply live.” —Gandhi In the introduction to Duane Elgin’s book Voluntary Simplicity, Ram Dass writes, “A vast new frontier beckons. The ‘answers’ that we seek will be of our own making – they are still in the process of being discovered in our own lives. And yet for many of us this is not enough. We want to see more clearly…how we might adapt our daily lives to fit harmoniously into the larger...

— by Susan Eirich, Ph.D. — “We are being compelled...to take a quantum evolutionary leap. This leap could transfigure us and transform all social, economic, and political systems so that they honor equality, harmony with nature, justice for all sentient beings, and a sacred way of life that will bring peace to our earth. This is the Hope that illuminates my vision of Sacred Activism.”—Andrew Harvey, The Hope In this difficult time for all beings on our Earth we are called to speak and act from our deepest selves, our deepest wisdom, our deepest resources. We are called to lead, each in our own way, and to participate with others, all leading together. These times are...

— by Susan Eirich, Hope McKenzie, Chelsea Carson — “For thousands of years animals have migrated in a rhythm as primal as a heartbeat, followed by their human and animal hunters.”* Disturbing these vital ancient patterns; cutting two continents in half for the sake of temporary political expediency, will cause permanent species loss, habitat damage, and immeasurable suffering for wildlife. With the construction of an eighteen-foot steel and concrete wall along the United States and Mexico border nearly a thousand species, many already endangered and under great stress, will no longer be able to follow ancient traditions of migration, mating, hunting and foraging, critical to their...

Close up of bear feet

— by Susan Eirich, Ph.D. — There are places in Yellowstone National Park where alternating grizzly bear footsteps are worn deep into the earth, forming trails that lead to very specific sites at geothermal vents. These footsteps are almost sculpted into the ground as each bear places its foot precisely into the tracks of its predecessor, rubbing its feet sideways in each track. Arriving at the site, the bears begin to eat the soil, high in potassium and sulfur. One theory is that the sulfur helps rejuvenate their digestive system after the long inactivity of hibernation, and they may be low in potassium after their winter’s fast. How do they know to go there? Does each bear...

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