EARTHFIRE STORIES

 -- by Susan Eirich, PhD -- A few weeks ago we received a phone call from a woman named Amanda. Could we take a baby domesticated fox? Could she come visit to judge for herself if he would be well taken care of? We had lost our beloved Feather the fox to a gentle old age and did have the space. We said sure. Amanda had purchased Loki from a breeder as a pet, and discovered that she could not legally keep him once she moved to Idaho. She obviously cared for him. She gave him up reluctantly, quizzing us about how we cared for animals, leaving, coming back to ask more questions, then calling several times later asking after his welfare. Loki arrived in her arms along with a huge red...

Animals want our help, we just have to listen. The following video is of a raven who went to humans for help after being quilled by a porcupine. It is pretty amazing how the raven just sits there, allowing the humans to pull the embedded quills from its face. We asked animal communicator Penelope Smith what she thought about this video and this is what she said: On watching the video, it is clear from the raven’s actions and thoughts that he came for help. It hurt to have the quills pulled even though he knew it had to be done, so he squawked and struck out a bit. He had been hurting for a few days when he came to people he assessed as safe to solicit their help. Yes, people...

She was in her 17th year. We brought her into our cabin several months ago to winter with us because she was so old and winter was so cold. She looked like she was pretty much done with life and we expected her to pass on in a matter of days, or a week or two. That was 5 1/2 months ago. After a few days indoors she apparently began to trust that these were her new, luxurious living quarters and that life was good. She perked up. She explored. She ate with great interest (we must admit that we did feed her the tenderest juiciest morsels of a variety of treats). She took long, long naps ensconced on several layers of soft blankets on a heated floor. When she woke and struggled to her feet,...

We took Huckleberry Bear Bear for a walk. He sniffed, explored, rustled in the grass. He had a glorious time. Then it happened . . . Huckleberry Bear Bear wanted a nap. Huckleberry Bear Bear found a cozy hole between two big rocks all hidden in some bushes. It was so inviting. Just right. He settled in. He made himself comfortable. He even made a sun-warmed rock into a pillow. What a smart bear! After a while we  tried to bring him home. He didn't want to move. As a matter of fact he refused to budge. We watched the cold rain clouds move closer and the sun begin to set. But Huckleberry Bear Bear is 700 pounds. That is a lot of bear for any human to try to...

She was a stunning white wolf of unusual athletic ability—all lightness, grace, and agility. We named her Mariah because she could run like the wind. One day, when she was two years old, Jean and I turned our heads away for a moment. When we turned back she was lying on the ground with utter panic in her eyes. Her back legs were paralyzed. Paralysis is a horrible death sentence for a wild animal. We rushed her to the Don, the vet. I drove, and Jean lay in the back of the truck with Mariah, comforting her. Her sides were swelling as we drove, symptoms of colic that kills so many animals. Don immediately inserted a needle in her side to relieve the pressure from the gas causing the...

(Visited 4,034 times, 1 visits today)