EARTHFIRE STORIES

— by Susan Eirich, Ph.D. — Jose, our animal caretaker, approached me with something cupped gently in his large gloved hands – a tiny baby sparrow. He had found it near the coyotes and was afraid it was about to be eaten. It was fully feathered but still had that large pathetic yellow-rimmed baby mouth that young birds have. He could flutter along the ground but wasn’t quite yet able to fly. I held him for a bit while Jean went to get a bird cage. Its tiny feet clung tightly to my fingers as I cupped him to help him feel warm and secure in the dark. Still, I could feel his heart beating wildly. Mom and baby sparrow We put him in a small cage while I thought what to do. I...

-- by Susan Eirich, PhD -- I went to a meditation retreat recently, seeking the deepest, most effective way to help the animals’ voices be heard, but at first all I could think of was chickens. The food was vegetarian and there were huge bowls of eggs on the side for those who felt they needed more protein. Mounds and mounds of brown and white eggs. For those of us lucky enough to have chickens, and are able to let them run free and be themselves, you know how neat they are. What a sense of comfort, peacefulness and companionship they give us as they race around, Mother Hen scratching with great energy and intensity, digging and catching bugs. The rooster calls excitedly when he finds a...

Sometimes when people call us in the morning they comment we seem rushed. That is because meditating with wolves had recently been added to our daily routine. This is our current early morning schedule, which starts about 7 am – we are at the moment a two-wolf; two-dog cabin. Every winter Wamaka the wolf loses the hair on his back end, loses weight and goes into depression. We just can’t leave him out in the below zero cold half naked and sad. He has to come in to the cabin for warmth, love and light. But we have learned from bitter bitter bitter experience and the cost of thousands of vet dollars that if Cucumber the wolf doesn’t come into the cabin every morning for love and...

This year will be my second visit to Earthfire Institute, and while there are many good friends there, I am especially looking forward to spending more time with Windwalker the cougar. Windwalker has a powerful presence and a great heart that is both awe-inspiring and humbling. His love for wildlife expert and friend Jean Simpson of Earthfire is very clear as you will see in the photos. But Windwalker is something more—in my opinion he is a spiritual Master Teacher/Healer. And I’m not the only one who thinks so. Other workshop attendees and workshop leaders/animal communicators such as Penelope Smith and Polly Klein have expressed the same opinion. It was that belief that...

He was found at a roadside zoo, just a few weeks old, and it was clear even then that he was a “differently-abled” bear. Now four years old he is enormous for his age, but it isn’t the size you notice first – it is a gentleness, an innocence. It is in the expression of his face, in his movements, the whole feeling he emanates. Most animals at Earthfire have names reflecting their magnificence – Northwind, the wolf; Windwalker the cougar. But as we watched him play, sweetly, gently, not too coordinated, not too quick on the draw, the name just came out – Humble Bumble. When we first brought him home he would lie on his back in our arms absolutely rigid, eyes staring...

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