We often find ourselves consumed by busy schedules filled with endless engagements, responsibilities and demanding deadlines. In the process of having to be somewhere or do something, it is easy not to attend to our restoring ability to just be. How do we tune out of our distractions and into Life? We can make a date with Nature, put it on our calendar, and insist on it. It is really a date with our Selves. It needn’t be long - it can be only 5 minutes. We just have to do it, to help our brains make that transition. Nature can actually alleviate stress and anxiety while increasing our capacity to listen and connect with other living beings. We recently had a staff retreat where...

— by Hope McKenzie — One action we can take that is really meaningful--and if many of us do it, really powerful--is to investigate available incentives for clean energy; make it a point to use one if possible, and let others in your community or network know about these options.   Local energy companies around the country are implementing incentives to wean people away from coal-fired power.  With the simple click of a mouse, customers can choose to get a percentage of their power from a clean energy source.  The Department of Energy also offers numerous tax credits, rebates and clean energy loans designed to encourage and support the switch to renewable energy...

— by Hope McKenzie — Technology has spawned a loss of intimacy and connection, both with each other and with the world around us.  All of us are familiar with the sight of people enclosed in their own virtual domain, oblivious to those around them.  As we distance ourselves from the world in which we live—and all of its inhabitants and wonders—we lose site of its interconnectedness with us, of its gifts and of our own needs. We tune out of the individual voices once so resonant and into a cacophony of images and words that exist only in that virtual domain, wrenching ourselves from the natural world in which we inherently belong.  ...

— by Chelsea Carson — Last time we spoke about the necessity of maintaining wildlife corridors so animals can move freely as needed for survival. In our blog this week we discuss the proposed border wall across the US-Mexico border and what we can do. This 1900-mile long wall will cut off the natural flow of life and habitat for at least 700 hundred species of animals, some of them already stressed or endangered. To help prevent the wall a first step is to become active in the dialogue and events around this issue. Calling our local government officials, signing petitions, writing editorial pieces for magazines and newspapers- any way to add our voices to the opposition is helpful....

— by Chelsea Carson — Just as humans use roads, airways, and trails to travel between places, wildlife must also use corridors to travel between habitats. A wildlife corridor connects two or more similar areas of native wildlife habitat so wild animals may freely move through time and space. These corridors are incredibly important for migratory routes, breeding cycles, food sources, and the natural flow of movement for each individual and species. Many of the important animal “freeways” throughout the world have been fragmented due to human development, agriculture, and private land use. One good deed we can do to help wildlife is to protect or restore critical local habitat....

— by Chelsea Carson — Each of us has a responsibility to do what we can to work towards a compassionate and sustainable future. What we do matters. One important way we can be a steward of the Earth is to decrease our plastic waste. Examples: buying bulk in reusable containers; not using plastic straws, (you can make a surprising impact with this, more information here); not using plastic water bottles (and it's bad for you!). The use of plastic is everywhere. When we make decisions not to use it, it is important to talk to people about why. This is how change starts. Use reusable alternatives to lower our reliance on single-use plastic items. Share with us and your community the...