— by Chelsea Carson — Last time we spoke about the necessity of maintaining wildlife corridors so animals can move freely as needed for survival. In our blog this week we discuss the proposed border wall across the US-Mexico border and what we can do. This 1900-mile long wall will cut off the natural flow of life and habitat for at least 700 hundred species of animals, some of them already stressed or endangered. To help prevent the wall a first step is to become active in the dialogue and events around this issue. Calling our local government officials, signing petitions, writing editorial pieces for magazines and newspapers- any way to add our voices to the opposition is helpful....

— by Chelsea Carson — Just as humans use roads, airways, and trails to travel between places, wildlife must also use corridors to travel between habitats. A wildlife corridor connects two or more similar areas of native wildlife habitat so wild animals may freely move through time and space. These corridors are incredibly important for migratory routes, breeding cycles, food sources, and the natural flow of movement for each individual and species. Many of the important animal “freeways” throughout the world have been fragmented due to human development, agriculture, and private land use. One good deed we can do to help wildlife is to protect or restore critical local habitat....

— by Chelsea Carson — Each of us has a responsibility to do what we can to work towards a compassionate and sustainable future. What we do matters. One important way we can be a steward of the Earth is to decrease our plastic waste. Examples: buying bulk in reusable containers; not using plastic straws, (you can make a surprising impact with this, more information here); not using plastic water bottles (and it's bad for you!). The use of plastic is everywhere. When we make decisions not to use it, it is important to talk to people about why. This is how change starts. Use reusable alternatives to lower our reliance on single-use plastic items. Share with us and your community the...

-- by Chelsea Carson -- The summer solstice has passed and millions of us are heading out to nature, which is a wonderful thing. However, millions of us treading outside can make a huge negative impact on the wild lands and the living beings we are there to enjoy. From flowers reaching their lovely heads to the sun, their whole being focused on setting seed and perpetuating their species, to the animals we so want to see. Imagine if thousands of people came walking through your home during a weekend. You would want then to be thoughtful. Impacts are inevitable but consciously minimizing impacts is our choice. Nature is not a backdrop for human activities, though we may perceive it that...

-- by Susan Eirich, Ph.D. -- We often feel powerless in the face of all that is happening on the Earth, but it is surprising how doing one good deed can help us feel, and be, powerful.  Our action can grow in surprising ways once we have started along that way of thinking; begun that flow of energy. A sample suggestion: make a sanctuary or altar for yourself.  It can be any size, anywhere: a desk top, a window sill, a corner of a room, a place under a tree.  Make it a practice to go daily.  At that sanctuary you can connect with yourself first.  From there ideas for action can begin to form. On a more immediately practical level, make a sanctuary for an animal or a plant, be it...

— by Chelsea Carson — To understand how we, as individuals, can positively impact the Earth, we must first be aware of the impact of our own actions. We cannot change our behaviors if we don't understand the effect they have on the world around us. Beginning to question our daily actions, and making choices that promote positive change, rather than automatically following what others are doing; or purchasing what is available without questioning if we need it, is an excellent first step to becoming an active guardian of the Earth. * For example, when using a piece of paper, reflect on the journey this paper took, all the way back to the living community that...