THE EARTHFIRE BLOG

One Good Deed: Idea and Action Exchange

Each month we have will a suggestion for something we can do and invite your responses, ideas and actions. Ours will come from the basic principle of spiritual ecology,...

-- by Susan Eirich, PhD -- Hope, a feral wolf-dog, was caught between two worlds. Not just the wild and the human, but even more, between deeply ingrained hard-wiring for fear and self-preservation, and the need to connect. Once we trapped him it took a very long time for him begin to tentatively trust anything; dog, wolf or human. But he so wanted to! On some level he understood that to connect was to fill a hunger. And in the larger picture, that to connect was to ensure survival. These things, when one considers them, are mysterious. He took a chance; he dared. Why? We humans made an effort. But so did Hope. This wasn’t humans “taming” a wolf dog. He had to participate...

Thunder, an ancient wolf, lay dying. Strong old wolf that he was, he lingered for days in the shade of his favorite pine tree. We finally called Don, our vet, to help him pass on. Thunder lay in our Wildlife Garden, far out of sight of all the other wolves. Don kneeled down, gently gave him the shot, and listened to his heart. The instant the life left his body, all fifteen of our wolves started to howl in a long, low, mournful howl in an exquisite harmony of voices. They had no way of see- ing or hearing what was going on. Yet somehow they knew. Our practical and conservative vet, still on his knees, turned pale and muttered “that’s eerie.” He stood up, looking around for...

-- by Susan Eirich, PhD -- Usually each year the bears give us clear notice that they are ready to go to bed for the winter. They start to look pathetic; droopy, like a sleepy child before nap time. But this year it was different. It has been warm and they continued to eat. And eat. And eat. Not that they needed to. They had rather well developed layers of fat. Enough for two winters I would say. But the weather apparently just didn’t seem like winter. Plus we got in some mangoes…..and some really good honey crisp apples…... Humble Bumble preparing his den with new hay - Photo by Earthfire Eventually their appetite declined. Finally, the day before our first real snowstorm, they...

-- by Susan Eirich, PhD -- We never really know how things will turn out. Events that appear terrible can actually be positive in the long run. I personally would classify the result of the election a terrible thing, predominantly because of climate change. We humans can survive all the various dislocations that will happen based on poor political decisions, though that is not to discount the suffering that individuals may go through. But with denying climate change we will be affecting all Life on earth. All life lies helpless before us, awaiting our decision and actions. But the good news. We can use this event to energize us to stop depending on government to take action. Yes they...

-- by Richard Landry -- A few days after the presidential election, I received an email from Marina Gorbis, executive director of the Institute for the Future. It was one of at least a dozen emails I received during the week from various nonprofit organizations, all expressing some version of despair or defiance over the election result, infused with anxiety and fear over what would come of it all in the end. But Marina’s letter was different. In it, she wrote: The future is still a safe place. It’s a place where we can imagine beyond the confusion of today to create a world that everyone can inhabit with their bodies, their hearts, and their spirit. At times like this, despair,...

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