THE EARTHFIRE BLOG

Beautiful Heartbreak: On receiving a wildlife rehabilitation license.

— by Susan B. Eirich, Ph.D. — I recently listened to a reading by poet David Whyte about “beautiful heartbreak.” I immediately thought about the rehabilitation...

All around us are tiny micro-environments that seem like nothing to us, but are life and death to other life. This is "just" a sagebrush, but it is Home, Safety, Life to some other creature. Nothing in nature is "just" anything. It all has importance, and needs to be treated with respect. These micro-environments exist everywhere on earth. Discovering them wherever we live gives us a rich sense of wonder and expands our larger picture of the life in which we are embedded.  It increases our respect for and delight in Life. Share with us ones you discover, where you live. -- Susan Eirich,...

It’s deep winter here in snowy Driggs, Idaho, where the bears have gone to sleep, and life quietly gestates beneath the snow in preparation for new life, new beginnings. Life springs eternal. Here in tiny Driggs, more than 900 people participated in January’s global Women’s March, each contributing with their presence to a world-wide movement in support of social and environmental issues. And from here, I could see and feel the energy of all the women’s marches all over the world... women, men, and children sharing the same aspirations for a better future, in person and online, through the power of our global, interconnected age. We truly are all in it together. We can see it. We...

-- by Susan Eirich, PhD -- On Sundays the coyotes and foxes get fresh eggs from our excellent chickens. The eggs are inhaled, gone before they hit the ground. You have to be quick. If you stay there to enjoy their enjoyment you hear about it very clearly from the other animals. Someone getting a treat is never unnoticed no matter how sneaky you try to be. If Foxie Moxie sees someone else getting an egg first, the outraged screaming sets you back on your heels. Your first reaction is that there must be some life-threatening emergency. Which from her point of view apparently it is. Loki the fox is a bit more genteel but not much. Faerytale the coyote just sends mute signals of desperation....

Yesterday I drove over Teton Pass back home to Earthfire in a bit of a snowstorm. Up up up you go the the top of the pass in driving wind and snow, sensing rather than seeing the bulk of the mountain on the right; the drop into space on the left. You are in wilderness where the elements are in charge, in a metal box on wheels with heat, a fragile protection. Fifteen minutes later, driving down the other side, you enter calm weather, clear roads and the lights and warmth of civilization. Such a dramatic transition, from mountain weather and wilderness, to the settled valleys. The dramatic juxtaposition gives us an appreciation for the power of nature that we don't grasp living in a city...

Walking my malamute in the cold of a January morning, the sun rising behind the Grand Teton mountains, once again the word “the guardians” enters my mind. They overlook the valley, these three grand mountains, an ever-looming presence. Many people spontaneously say they feel them as protectors. True or not, people through the ages felt they had protectors in one form or another – plants, animals, spirits. Despite the advent of science, if we scratch beneath the surface that ancient sensation is still with us. True or not it gives comfort. And if it gives comfort, then it makes things better and thus can have real effects, easing stress; giving us the feeling something larger than us...

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