THE EARTHFIRE BLOG

Spiritual Ecology
August 4, 2017

From the Frontiers of Science

— by Susan Eirich, Ph.D. — As left brained engineer and astronaut Edgar Mitchell hurtled back toward the earth, he saw it in all its vulnerable beauty, hanging...

— by Susan Eirich, Hope McKenzie, Chelsea Carson — “For thousands of years animals have migrated in a rhythm as primal as a heartbeat, followed by their human and animal hunters.”* Disturbing these vital ancient patterns; cutting two continents in half for the sake of temporary political expediency, will cause permanent species loss, habitat damage, and immeasurable suffering for wildlife. With the construction of an eighteen-foot steel and concrete wall along the United States and Mexico border nearly a thousand species, many already endangered and under great stress, will no longer be able to follow ancient traditions of migration, mating, hunting and foraging, critical to their...

— by Chelsea Carson — Last time we spoke about the necessity of maintaining wildlife corridors so animals can move freely as needed for survival. In our blog this week we discuss the proposed border wall across the US-Mexico border and what we can do. This 1900-mile long wall will cut off the natural flow of life and habitat for at least 700 hundred species of animals, some of them already stressed or endangered. To help prevent the wall a first step is to become active in the dialogue and events around this issue. Calling our local government officials, signing petitions, writing editorial pieces for magazines and newspapers- any way to add our voices to the opposition is helpful....

— by Chelsea Carson — Just as humans use roads, airways, and trails to travel between places, wildlife must also use corridors to travel between habitats. A wildlife corridor connects two or more similar areas of native wildlife habitat so wild animals may freely move through time and space. These corridors are incredibly important for migratory routes, breeding cycles, food sources, and the natural flow of movement for each individual and species. Many of the important animal “freeways” throughout the world have been fragmented due to human development, agriculture, and private land use. One good deed we can do to help wildlife is to protect or restore critical local habitat....

— by Chelsea Carson — Having gathered now for our third online Conversation, the response to our developing deeply-rooted community has been inspiring. Expanding on our first two discussions on “How Connecting with an Animal Can Help Us Heal the Earth,” we joined together on July 26th for a heart based discussion on the nature of consciousness and how it relates to animal intelligence and our connection to nature. Susan talked about how we may begin to integrate non-human living beings unique intelligences and wisdoms into our journey forward. Having just returned from the Institute for Noetic Sciences conference she weaved topics and experiences from the weekend into our...

— by Susan Eirich, Ph.D. — August 1, 2017 A sweet young volunteer, Gwen, came into the office walking softly, her hands cupped together in front of her ever so gently, holding something apparently very delicate and precious.  It was a baby bird. She had seen it tumble off our roof from under the gable onto the ground. She rushed to pick it up. It was still alive. It was far too young to survive out of the nest, having just sprouted a few tufts of feathers sticking out in ungainly fashion from its naked pink skin.  It was a baby sparrow. Left to Right: Baby sparrow just fallen off roof, baby sparrow in hand | Photo by Earthfire Here was a golden opportunity for Gwen,...

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